Waste management

Waste

 

With the crash of the international waste market Council officers recently provided the following information about waste management in Willoughby.

 

1. Sydney recycling plant to shut as market prices collapse, costs soar.
https://www.smh.com.au/national/nsw/sydney-recycling-plant-to-shut-as-market-pricescollapse-costs-soar-20200211-p53znn.html

Willoughby Council was notified in December 2019 that Polytrade would cease recycling
operations on 31 January 2020. A new arrangement between JJ Richards and iQRenew
commenced on 3 February 2020 and will continue for the term of the waste collection
contract in July 2022.

The new recycling arrangement will cost approximately $1 million per annum more than what was originally budgeted however the cost to recycle the material is still less than the cost to send it to landfill. There will be no impacts on the budget in the current
financial year due to reduced costs in waste disposal. There are adequate Waste
Reserves to cater for the increased costs in the 2020/21 financial year.
2. Burning Waste for energy
https://reneweconomy.com.au/will-sydney-burn-its-trash-cleanaway-proposes-newwaste-to-energy-project-72404/

Council has no policy regarding burning waste for energy. We are currently waiting for
the NSW Governments 20 Year Waste Strategy discussion paper (set to be released this

3. The previous WCC Waste Committee and members of the community have over 20
years requested that WCC establish a food waste collection and recycling scheme.
In response to those concerns WCC undertook the Non Fatty-Food Waste
Collection Trial (1999) with promising results. However, food waste stream was
not progressed and food waste remains a large proportion of our waste. Outline
potential for council to establish an food/organic waste collection, similar to those
that operate in Melbourne, Penrith and Inner West LGAs.

The food waste stream is being addressed. Since 2007 Willoughby Council, as part of
the NSROC Waste Alliance, has processed its waste through Veolia’s Advanced Waste
Technologies (AWT) at Woodlawn Eco-precinct. This process extracts the organic
composition (food waste) to produce compost and capture methane gas which then
produces energy, this waste is being processed by Veolia. Veolia are awaiting a site
specific approval from the NSW EPA to use the compost-like product to rehabilitate the
old mine site at Woodlawn Eco-precinct.

4. Quantify wastes captured in GPT in total, and where possible the approximate
weight of waste (plastic, glass) captured that may otherwise be recycled. Quantify
costs to council to remove this waste that should not have entered our stormwater
systems. What other more effective systems may be developed to remove this
waste, litter and debris from streets, and stormwater and/or potential that this
waste be sorted and streamed?
The current year’s budget for GPT and Water Sensitive Urban Design (WSUD) cleaning
is $100k. It is estimated that this year we will remove 250 tonnes of material from these
devices. In February 2019, an audit was conducted into GPT waste. The top five items of
litter are: Ceramics/Rock (30.1%), Plastic Film/Bags (22.8%), Textiles/Rags (8.5%),
Aluminium beverage containers (8%), woody organics (7.7%) and PET containers (6%).
These services are contracted to a third party service provider who claims to divert over
90% of this waste away from landfill. The waste is screened and then used to make
compost and soil mixes.

Willoughby City Council has delivered the majority of its GPTs as planned. The following
4 years will focus on:

  • WSUD – creating more naturalised pond areas, rain-gardens and bio-retention
    areas.
  • Street sweeping – Increasing the amount of street sweeping to reduce pollutants
    entering into waterways.
  • Targeted pollution reduction – In 2021 Willoughby will be trialling surveillance and
    data monitoring to identify and target suspected polluters to reduce waste
    pollutants entering into waterways.

5. According to media (SMH 12.2.20) council may increase waste charges. Please
provide estimation of potential waste fee increases and when may these be
introduced.

The new recycling arrangement will cost an additional $1 million per year. However the
cost to recycle the material is still less than the cost to send it to landfill. There will be no
impacts on the budget in the current financial year due to reduced costs in waste
disposal. There are adequate Waste Reserves to cater for the increased costs in the
2020/21 financial year.

6. Extent to which council will be precluded from initiating other waste management
strategies (e.g. recycling plastics, food) as a result of the NSROC waste contract.
The NSROC Waste Alliance provides five councils in the region access to the $100
million dollar Advanced Waste Technologies (AWT) processing facility. If approval is
given to apply the compost to mine site rehabilitation, over the 10 year contract period up to 280,000 tonnes of waste will be diverted from landfill.

The NSROC Waste Alliance arrangement provides a solution for red-bin garbage and
clean up (bulky) waste. Council has an arrangement with SUEZ to compost garden
organics. This high quality compost has a very low contamination rate (less than 2%).
Council is now sending its recycling to iQRenew, and materials are being processed
locally.

7. Waste management in many multi-unit buildings is in need of improvement, as a
result of poor waste streaming, overflowing bins and presence rats. How can
council escalate strategies to improve waste education more effectively
throughout our community, improve waste management, re-use and recycling,
reduce waste, and eliminate rats and other feral vermin.
This year, Council is commencing a Multi-unit Dwelling waste project which will include
collaboration with strata, building managers and body corporates and involves
conducting a site audit of every bin room. The project will focus on ensuring Council’s
data on the number and type of bins at each premises is up to date and to ensure
buildings have sufficient recycling bins and appropriate signage. Council already
contacts strata and building managers with offers of free educational materials and letter box drops at buildings with waste management issues but is unable to install
infrastructure or signage on private property without the landowner’s consent.
Bin rooms need to be supervised by occupiers and building managers, so that they are
kept clean, excess waste is controlled and bins are not overflowing. Council may, upon
receiving complaint, direct the owners/occupiers by way of a Local Government Act 1993
Order to take appropriate action to ensure that the land is in a safe and healthy
condition. If the problem persists and is significant where vermin is identified, Council
may require a vermin proof garbage area to be constructed.

8. Plastic Free Willoughby – Quantify reduction in single use plastic bags and
containers saved within the LGA as a result of the initiative.
Council started working with the Chatswood markets in August 2018. Officers requested
all stallholders remove plastic bags, plastic cutlery, straws and plastic takeaway
containers. Council does not monitor and verify data on single use plastic at Chatswood
markets or any other location as it is not feasible to collect this information. However
anecdotally there has been a noticeable reduction in single use plastic.
In addition to this, the internal Willoughby City Council ban on single-use plastic has
drastically reduced plastic use due to the provision of reusable items which can be
borrowed for internal meetings, seminars and workshops.
Council is continuing to focus on single use plastic reduction. A new behaviour-change
app (Bye Bye Plastic) will soon be trialled to further encourage the reduction in plastic
use.

9. Proportion of Waste Levy collected by NSW government that is returned to
council.
The NSW Waste Levy raises nearly $800 million each year. According to a NSW
Parliamentary Inquiry in 2018, about 13 percent of the Waste Levy revenue was
reinvested in waste and regulatory programs, and a further 13 percent went to
environmental programs. In 2018/19, Willoughby City Council paid $2.2 million in Waste
Levy payments. Willoughby received around $110K during the same period as part of
the Waste Less, Recycle More grants program. In February 2019 Council wrote to the
NSW Premier and Minister for Local Government, Environment and Heritage for the
waste levy to be re-invested in the waste and recycling industry and to help build a
circular economy.

10. Capacity for council to advocate for increased and extended producer
responsibility e.g. for packaging.
Willoughby City Council joined the LGNSW ‘Save our Recycling’ campaign in December
2018, advocating for the Waste Levy to be re-invested in the waste and recycling
industry and to help build a circular economy.

11. Quantify proportion waste from demolition across Willoughby LGA that is
recycled. How is it monitored? Does it comply with council resolution that
minimum 85% building waste be recycled?
All Development Applications approved by Willoughby Council must include a Waste
Management Plan. This details how the development will achieve an 85% recycling
target. This is now standard practice for the construction and demolition industry in NSW, in part due to the waste levy (currently $143.60 per tonne) and high landfill disposal costs. It is now cheaper to sort construction and demolition waste and have it recycled than sent to landfill.

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To become or renew as a member of CWWPA before March 30, direct deposit $10* with your name in the reference field to BSB: 032090 Acct: 548083 & complete our Membership Application.  *Non-refundable subject to meeting membership criteria.

 

 

Underground power

PowerPolesChina

The motion below by Clr. Wright is quite interesting. Until you notice the motion is to NOTE the information provided, not actually to do anything about the issue.

Elections on the horizon?

 

Councillor Wright has indicated his intention to move the following Notice of Motion.
Motion: That Council resolves to:

NOTE:
1. During and following the recent floods on the Willoughby and across the State
thousands of residences have been without power for significant lengths of time
occasioning great hardship and expense.
2. As far back as 2002 the NSW IPART conducted an Inquiry into Electricity
Undergrounding in New South Wales, which highlighted the quantifiable and
unquantifiable benefits of undergrounding powerlines and cables:
i. Avoided costs associated with motor vehicle accidents
ii. Improved reliability of electricity supply
iii. Avoided maintenance cost
iv. Reduction in lost revenue to Distribution Network Service Providers
v. Improved public amenity
vi. Improved environment
vii. Improved public and workplace safety
viii. New opportunities
ix. Reduced health risks.
3. The Federal Parliament’s Inquiry in 1996/1997 found “In most Australian states,
underground power delivery is compulsory in new, outer suburban subdivisions
and this has had some impact in recent years. It is estimated that between 150
000 and 200 000 new homes are connected to underground power supplies each
year throughout Australia, and over a number of decades this will result in a
significant proportion of the national housing stock having underground
connection”.
4. The undergrounding of powerlines involved significant expense, further delay
increases the cost.

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To become or renew as a member of CWWPA before March 30, direct deposit $10* with your name in the reference field to BSB: 032090 Acct: 548083 & complete our Membership Application.  *Non-refundable subject to meeting membership criteria.

 

 

Library hours

library

Another election move? At least this motion is asking for something to be done – a report.

 

Councillor Zhu has indicated his intention to move the following Notice of motion.

That Council:
1. Prepares a review of the opening hours and utilisation of all branches of the
Willoughby City Library Network.
2. That the review will also provide data to support opportunities to expand the
opening hours of Chatswood Library:
i) on Friday nights beyond 6pm;
ii) on Saturday nights beyond 5pm;
iii) on Sunday beyond the current 2pm – 5pm arrangement; and
iv) during peak HSC and university examination time periods in the months of
June, July, September, October and November.
SUPPORTING INFORMATION PROVIDED BY THE COUNCILLOR ON THE
NOTICE OF MOTION
The local government area of Willoughby City Council has seven libraries which include
Chatswood, Artarmon, Castle Cove, Castlecrag, Naremburn, Northb

Super for councillors?

SuperThe Office of Local Government has issued a discussion paper to seek the views of councils and their local communities on whether councillors should receive superannuation payments.

Under the Commonwealth Superannuation Guarantee (Administration) Act 1993, councils across Australia are not required to make superannuation contributions in relation to the fees they pay to mayors and councillors. This is because mayors and councillors are elected to a civic office in a council and are not employees of the council.

The release of the discussion paper has been prompted by concerns raised by mayors and councillors that the ineligibility of councillors to receive superannuation payments is inequitable and is a deterrent to more women and younger people standing as candidates at council elections.

The discussion paper is available on the Office of Local Government’s (OLG) website at www.olg.nsw.gov.au. 

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To become or renew as a member of CWWPA before March 30, direct deposit $10* with your name in the reference field to BSB: 032090 Acct: 548083 & complete our Membership Application.  *Non-refundable subject to meeting membership criteria.

 

 

Pragmatic Artarmom

ArtarmonVillage99

The article below from the Artarmon Gazette  strikes a pragmatic balance between development and community amenity.

“with the absence of a coherent Council strategy, developers and the Land & Environment Court will deal with matters on a site by site ‘spot rezoning‘ basis”

ArtarmonVillage

___________________________________________________

To become or renew as a member of CWWPA before March 30, direct deposit $10* with your name in the reference field to BSB: 032090 Acct: 548083 & complete our Membership Application.  *Non-refundable subject to meeting membership criteria.

 

 

Golf club revitalisation

Golf Club99

Chatswood Golf Club is holding community information sessions about their planned re-vitalisation of the course and clubhouse. Full details below. The session planned are for:

Tuesdays: 10th, 17th, 24th and 31st March
between 1pm–2pm

Thursdays: 12th, 19th, 26th March and 2nd April
between 5pm–6pm

Chatswood Golf Club (CGC) and Watermark invite you to come and hear about their innovative project which proposes to deliver a brand new Golf Club and Seniors Living Development.

The planned development will ensure the survival of the Golf Club, preserve the green space of the golf course and include a number of features that will benefit the local community.

CGC – Community Info Sessions

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To become or renew as a member of CWWPA before March 30, direct deposit $10* with your name in the reference field to BSB: 032090 Acct: 548083 & complete our Membership Application.  *Non-refundable subject to meeting membership criteria.

 

 

Anderson & Victoria

INTERSECTION OF ANDERSON ST, VICTORIA AVENUE AND CHATSWOOD MALL

Anderson

This intersection continues to be dangerous for pedestrians and problematic for buses and cars.

Pedestrian safety

Pedestrians waiting to cross Anderson St on the northern crossing at the side of the Westpac Bank are at risk of being struck by buses travelling west on Victoria Ave turning right into Anderson St. It looks like the temporary footpath barrier was installed incorrectly. Action: pedestrian barrier on Anderson St (west side) needs to be extended to the entrance of the Mall.

Pedestrians regularly cross against the pedestrian stop light on the southern Anderson St crossing: Action: requires regular policing.

Traffic regularly blocks the ‘scramble” type crossing elements at Victoria/Anderson/The Mall. This puts pedestrians legally using the crossing at risk of being struck by an illegally positioned vehicle if it moves. The situation is compounded as there is a non-pedestrian area within the intersection.

Actions:

  • Requires regular policing of vehicle movements.
  • Consideration also be given to making the entire intersection a scramble crossing (similar to Victoria/Archer).
  • Installation of ‘Do Not Block Intersection’ signs
  • Road surface markings (yellow hatched or Do Not Block Intersection markings)

Traffic flow issues

If traffic blocks the intersection, traffic travelling south in Anderson are blocked from crossing the intersection to continue south in Anderson. Similar problems for traffic travelling west in Victoria turning right into Anderson. Actions: the measures suggested above also address this issue.  

WESTFIELD PEDESTRIAN CROSSING IN ANDERSON

A significant contribution to the vehicles being trapped in the Victoria Ave/Anderson St intersection (heading south on Anderson Street) is due to this pedestrian crossing (between each side of Westfield).  If you look at the area on the weekend and on Thursday nights, there might be other times, it appears that a majority of activity at that crossing is pedestrian movements, which leaves the vehicles with few opportunities to proceed south towards Albert Ave, this in turn causes the traffic to bank back to the Victoria Ave/Anderson St intersection and vehicles to become trapped in the intersection when the lights are green (and they are still trapped there when the lights have gone red).

An investigation should be done to determine if this pedestrian crossing is a significant contribute to the problems of the Victoria Ave/Anderson St intersection.  If it is found that the pedestrian is causing problems, I would suggest a traffic management measure be put in place like traffic lights to bring the pedestrian and car sharing of the area back to 50/50 and the pedestrian lights can be syncronised with the Victoria Ave/Anderson Street traffic lights to enable cars heading south through that intersection have a place to move to. Action: Undertake investigation regarding installation of traffic lights,

RESTRICTING VEHICLES IN VICTORIA AVENUE BETWEEN ANDERSON AND ARCHER

There has been a suggestion that this segment of road be restricted to public transport (buses) and emergency vehicles only. There has not been a rationale given for the proposal. The major implications of this proposal would be the need to construct a ‘CBD Ring Road’ or ‘CBD By-pass Rout”. This could have major impact on residential street to the north of Victoria Ave.